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reetman
#1 Posted : 7/12/2009 1:26:00 PM

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A guy at my local craigslist is selling a Ibanez AR-50 from 1978.

He has send me a few pics



Now after some research, I've found that on the AR-50, there should normally be printed "crafted in Japan" on the back of the headstock


Can anyone tell me if this is the real deal?

thanx
GtrMan1
#3 Posted : 7/14/2009 4:47:55 PM
GtrMan1


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The Body looks like a real AR50BK, The finish on the original thought had a White line at the edge of the entire body, this guitar probably was re-condition, because of the refinishing the statement "Certified in Japan" below the serial number was erased (probably). There should also be this statement: "Proudly made by the people of Japan" in the plastic cover to acces the control knobs. The Tuners might had been changed the original ones were more like rounded shape.
Jason43
#5 Posted : 7/14/2009 8:42:43 PM
Jason43


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The AR50 would have had binding and I can't tell if the guitar in the picture does or not. If not, I believe it would be an AR30. Although, I don't recall either of those guitars having 24 frets like the one pictured.
1998 Ibanez Artist AR700
1983 Ibanez Artist AM50
2004 Ibanez Artcore AM77
1985 Ibanez Pro Line PL1770
Custom made doubleneck

Jason43
#7 Posted : 7/14/2009 9:31:14 PM
Jason43


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Could just be a factory freak, made from left over parts, ie a 2618 neck. 79 would have been at the end of the 2618's run and they may have had parts left over to get rid of. The 2618 is the only Artist I know of that had 24 frets. I couldn't see it being a refinished 2618 since the hardware and electronics are incorrect and a black 2618 would have had binding.
1998 Ibanez Artist AR700
1983 Ibanez Artist AM50
2004 Ibanez Artcore AM77
1985 Ibanez Pro Line PL1770
Custom made doubleneck

Ruler5000
#8 Posted : 7/15/2009 6:25:14 AM
Ruler5000


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I agree with Jason. I also think that this is a spot production with left over parts of the 2618. I have been checking some sites and the only 24 fret artist that I have come across is the 2618. The hardware and finish are closer to the AR30 and AR50. Best guess would be that its a spot production with a combination of parts from these three models. Depending on the amount of left over parts, this guitar will be really rare to find up to almost impossible because of the low numbers. It might also have been a way for the people at Ibanez to test color combinations for the new models to come during that year. In that case it might even have been a one off.
My Ibby's:
1975 2845 western acoustic
1977 2354S SG custom copy Mahogany
2002 RG7321 BK
1993 RG450 PN
2006 RGTHRG2 N.Y. City XI (Exotic)
2009 RGA32 MOL
2010 RGA42 BK
2005 SRX350 NT

Non-Ibby's:
1999 AriaProII MAC50 Tansparent Blue
1997 Manuel Serrang Spanish acoustic
nasticanasta
#4 Posted : 8/29/2010 10:21:22 PM
nasticanasta


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GtrMan1 wrote:
The Body looks like a real AR50BK, The finish on the original thought had a White line at the edge of the entire body, this guitar probably was re-condition, because of the refinishing the statement "Certified in Japan" below the serial number was erased (probably). There should also be this statement: "Proudly made by the people of Japan" in the plastic cover to acces the control knobs. The Tuners might had been changed the original ones were more like rounded shape.

definately not original finish or knobs.. still nice finish regardless..I do like the bindings though...but I never saw one of these in 24 frets either.
Thunderbird
#11 Posted : 12/30/2011 7:08:45 PM

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Man
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This is an all original guitar. I own the exact same guitar and purchased it new in 1978. It has a solid black body with rounded edges (unlike the squared off edges with the white piping on it)
The tuning pegs, Hardware and Volume/Tone Knobs are the same ones that are on my original. There is no made in Japan or Crafted in Japan markings on the Guitar. When I bought this from the dealer (Sam Ash) I was told that this model was in short supply and the price was not negotiable. I was offered the model with the white piping for less money but was not interested. I was there shopping for a Gibson SG (I also demo'd the Les Paul) but was thrilled with the tone of this guitar. It could give me tones that satisfied both the SG and Les Paul kind of styles that the Gibsons produced. It didn't sound the same as those but the sound fit in with those styles and at the same time created it own voice. I own 11 Guitars (Including a Les Paul and SG) and I still use this as often as any other guitar. I just recently got it back from a full check-up/service/intonation and it's as good as new. Currently I have High-Hats on the Volume/Tone Knobs. I Like the look of the original knobs but these are more practical for playing. It is not for sale.


Thunderbird attached the following image(s):
Thunderbird attached the following image(s): AR50_9788.jpg
Thunderbird attached the following image(s): AR50_9797.jpg
Thunderbird attached the following image(s): AR50_9800.jpg
ar50
#13 Posted : 6/8/2012 8:51:44 PM

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Thunderbird is correct. That appears to be a semi-stock AR-50. I have one that looks exactly the same; the rounded body, the tulip shaped tuners, the pickup rings with the tilt adjustment holes. There are also AR-50's out there with the body binding and headstock inlay; those are often shown in the sales literature, so the other posts are based upon this.

Since this is my first post, I'll tell the story of my AR-50:

I was a high school kid in 1979, washing dishes in a small town restaraunt in Penn for something like $2.25 per hour and bought the AR from Sam Ash in the local mall for something around $250. That's a lot of hours. I would bring it to school with a Pignose and other kids who were better than me taught me how to play it. (Free lessons). I had the typical teenage resentment regarding the rich kids who's parents bought them Les Pauls, but I got over it finally. Moved to California and played it in garage bands. I read an interview of Ed VH saying how he rewound his pickup...and Dad had a coil of wire in his toolbox, so around 1982... I stupidly ruined my stock Super 70 to try to sound like Ed VH...not realizing that he used the super 70 pickup in his Ibanez Destroyer in the VH1 album. Installed a shrill Dimarzio Super Distortion and moved forward. Acquired other guitars over the years but kept the AR and used it from time to time and recently installed a Duncan P-rail, which fits the look of the guitar and sounds REALLY good in there. Then I screwed it up again...

The Gibraltar bridge plating went bad in the typical mode, so I found a local guy to replate it....who had no experience on delicate guitar parts. They dissasembled the Gibraltar, seemingly with vice grips, and replated everything including the screw threads, and then horsed the parts back together, cracking all the saddles with the chrome-clogged threads. I felt lucky to find a replacement on Ebay.

My AR is kinda neck heavy, the frets are worn down, there are chips all over the body and headstock. The sound of the neck pup is sweet and the new P-Rail pup sounds good too. I have Les Pauls, Strats, an SG, some custom made guitars...but if there was a fire, I would save my old AR first.
CareyCorson
#12 Posted : 6/8/2012 9:41:08 PM

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Thunderbird;489821 wrote:
This is an all original guitar. I own the exact same guitar and purchased it new in 1978. It has a solid black body with rounded edges (unlike the squared off edges with the white piping on it)
The tuning pegs, Hardware and Volume/Tone Knobs are the same ones that are on my original. There is no made in Japan or Crafted in Japan markings on the Guitar. When I bought this from the dealer (Sam Ash) I was told that this model was in short supply and the price was not negotiable. I was offered the model with the white piping for less money but was not interested. I was there shopping for a Gibson SG (I also demo'd the Les Paul) but was thrilled with the tone of this guitar. It could give me tones that satisfied both the SG and Les Paul kind of styles that the Gibsons produced. It didn't sound the same as those but the sound fit in with those styles and at the same time created it own voice. I own 11 Guitars (Including a Les Paul and SG) and I still use this as often as any other guitar. I just recently got it back from a full check-up/service/intonation and it's as good as new. Currently I have High-Hats on the Volume/Tone Knobs. I Like the look of the original knobs but these are more practical for playing. It is not for sale.




Except that this guitar has 24 frets. From the photo, it looks like yours doesn't
ar50
#14 Posted : 6/12/2012 4:06:58 AM

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Location: california
Good spot on the 24 fret issue. I don't know how their assembly line was run, but I would think it possible that some AR-50 models were made from left over scraps as proposed by the earlier post. I saw in a book on flame top Les Pauls, that a guy discovered a blemished but highly flamed wood top on his stock (vintage) solid colored LP. Seemed the Gibson quality guys determined it was not up to snuff as a flame top, but it was structurally sound, so they patched it up and salvaged it by spraying a solid color. Why would Ibanez have both bound and round-edged AR-50's being sold at the same time? I would guess that a smart business decision was made to use black lacquer to salvage bodies that had grain patterns not quite up to Ibanez standards for translucent finishes...and why throw away a few hours of valuable labor time and some material costs if it could be sprayed black and called an AR-50. Probably the same for necks...even 24 fret ones. If you spend the time to fabricate a perfectly good neck that has an ugly knot or sap pocket that would be invisible under black...just put it on the AR-50 assembly line and avoid scrapping it. Since it was the entry level model, kids like me would not know the difference, we were just happy to afford a decent guitar. Perhaps that is the story on that one...
...
...I have noticed, looking on Ebay that the majority of AR-50's seem to be from the East coast as opposed to California. I wonder if they were more popular over there.
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