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More Sweepage!
Slippin G
#1 Posted : 12/27/2007 8:11:58 PM
Slippin G


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Greetings! I got one for you folks. I see a gazillion examples of sweeping major and minor triads, but not so many using 7th chords. Here is an example of a D Minor 7 Arpeggio using all 6 strings, beginning with the 5th of the chord on the bottom. The root of this chord here is the D note found on the 5th string, 5th fret, and one octave higher on the 3rd string, 7th fret. I chose this as an example because it is easy to finger ( one finger covers one fret), and easy to remember.

Special Thanks to Ouija, for his fabulous graphic representations!

Hand Clap


RED NOTES ARE PLUCKED. GREEN NOTES ARE HAMMERED ONTO OR PULLED OFF TO.

Minor 7th Sweep





Starting this at eighth notes @ 90 bpm would be a good start point, picking once per string, and trying to make hammered and pulled notes sound as strong as your picked notes. This does not necessarily mean flying hammer-ons from way above lol. In order to approach very high speeds, economical motion of the LEFT hand is also required.
This played at high speeds sounds...awesome! The key is to practice it so that every single note rings out, and they are evenly played.
Obviously, you can create one hell of an exercise by moving this shape up and down the neck!
If one really wants to get crazy, this is also great practice for alternate picking (down up down up, and also up down up down) because we are not always picking 2 notes per string.
Of course, there are many other 7th chords and many other inversions of them out there. This is but one.

Oh yeah, the notes played from bottom to top and down again are: A C D F A C D F A "C" A F D C A F D C A
I forgot to mention this would also work pretty well over a Gsus4 type chord.
:P
Wilky
#2 Posted : 12/28/2007 11:18:12 AM
Wilky


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ooh nice

Slippin G
#3 Posted : 12/28/2007 11:23:34 AM
Slippin G


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If we take the above Dm7 chord and lower the 5th a half step we get Dm7b5, or D half diminished. The spelling of the Dm7 chord is D F A C. The spelling of the Dm7b5 is D F Ab C. If we lower all the A notes from the above Dm7 arpeggio, we get this:

To D Half Diminished



Half Diminished Sweep



This arpeggio works over Dm7b5, which could be the ii in a ii V7 i progression in C Minor, but it also works over a Bb7, Bb9, or Bb13 dominant chord, outlining the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th (D F Ab C) of that chord.
This one is a little harder to play, as there is a stretch now on the low and high E strings. Again, it sounds sweet played fast.


:P
Slippin G
#4 Posted : 12/29/2007 3:50:38 AM
Slippin G


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And now to enter the realm of neo-classical shred...whatever you call it!
If we take the Dm7b5 chord and lower the 7th a half step we get D
Diminished Seventh, or D°7. This chord consists of the root, minor
third, diminished fifth (tritone), and diminished seventh (enharmonic
major sixth)
The cool thing about this chord is that it is symmetrical, with each
chord tone spaced a minor 3rd (3 frets) apart from the next. That said
this D°7 chord could also be F°7, Ab°7, or Cb°7. The spelling just
repeats itself over and over

Half Diminished to Full Diminished



Full Diminished Sweep



Think

1 3 1 4 2 1 3 2 1 (3) 1 2 3 1 2 4 1 3 1

The bottom numbers are a fingering that works for me with the (3) being the top of the arpeggio, but whatever works for you is good.

If you look at the 2 arpeggios that precede this one, you will notice that only one note has been lowered each time.

If you wanted to make a lick, you could for example make a pattern
based on the shape of the top 3 strings of this arpeggio and just keep
moving it up 3 frets, creating a sequence such as this:

|---------5--------5h7------------7---------7h10--------------10---------10h13-------
|------6--------6---------------9---------9------------------12----------12---------------
|-4h7--------7----------7h10--------10-----------10h13----------13-------------------
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
etc.
Again, this pattern begs to be sweeped, picking once per string. For
me, I would hit the G and B strings with a downstroke, and the high E
string with upstrokes, setting up the return to the G string each
time. Also this is awesome for alternate picking!
Hope this is fun for someone!
Peace
:P
Slippin G
#7 Posted : 1/20/2008 5:23:01 PM
Slippin G


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I have tracked examples of these arpeggios so you can hear what they
sound like. Each link will take you to a page with the track info and
a mini player, and it takes a minute for the green play button to
appear in the box in the upper left hand corner with the wave icon in
it.

On most of the examples I cycle through playing them in 8th notes, then
8th note triplets, then 16th notes, with a drum track behind it. The
idea that I want to convey is that I am trying to play these arpeggios
in time with a pulse, and not just playing this stuff as fast as I
possibly can muster and hope I end up on a beat.

To me, playing these arpeggios slowly and evenly is the key to being
able to do them fast AND IN TIME without sounding like garbage;
actually, playing them slow and even is hard enough if I am being
honest about how it REALLY sounds.

Wiki describes an arpeggio as a broken chord where the notes are played
or sung in succession rather than simultaneously. The word, like many
other musical terms, originates from Italian, in which it means "in the
manner of the harp."
How many times on You Tube have you seen someone
play a bass note followed by a succession of rapid fire white noise
garbage that contains another chord tone that you MIGHT be able to
identify? Yeah.

So here they are:

Minor 7th Arpeggio

Minor 7th Arpeggio Practice Idea

Minor7, Flat5 Arpeggio (Half Diminished)

Full Diminished Arpeggio

Arpeggiated Diminished Sequence - In this one, I harmonised it by playing the exact
same 8 note sequence (same fingering 3 frets up), and continuing on up
the fretboard a minor 3rd at a time.


:P
Slippin G
#21 Posted : 2/23/2008 1:30:06 PM
Slippin G


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Hi folks, just letting you know that Ouija and I are working up a newer, more comprehensive 7th chord arpeggio sweeping guide. Coming at ya soon! And thanks to Prime for "guiding" this thread! Excellent Robotics! Hand Clap
:P
i386
#23 Posted : 3/2/2008 7:51:22 PM
i386


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Thanks for doing this. I've been playing off and on for 21 years and have never gotten around to learning this technique. I'm running out of excuses lolWall
Ibanez S2170FB Prestige
Boss ME-50
eddlaila1
#24 Posted : 3/3/2008 6:20:38 AM
eddlaila1


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im just dizzy Wall
i dont belong here
Insanejughead
#25 Posted : 3/3/2008 6:25:38 AM
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eddlaila1 wrote:
im just dizzy Wall


Same here... I need to be awake to understand this.
Kevin
#27 Posted : 11/27/2008 9:50:56 AM
Kevin


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Wow I am really impressed with the way this forum is going with stuff like this. GReAT diagrams and info. A guitarist could come here and learn anything he or she wanted to without having to take lessons.

Makes me wish I had this web stuff when I started playing.

I just learned to play sweeps 4 years ago sooo..

Ouija
#28 Posted : 11/27/2008 6:42:33 PM
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Lol. I actually emailed him those 7th chord arpeggios he wanted, but he disappeared without trace before he did his further guide to sweeping. Never seen him since.
BackDoorEntry
#22 Posted : 2/18/2009 2:32:40 PM

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Slippin G wrote:
Hi folks, just letting you know that Ouija and I are working up a newer, more comprehensivE 7th chord arpeggio sweeping guide. Coming at ya soon! And thanks to Prime for "guiding" this thread! Excellent Robotics! Hand Clap


yus please lol Pray

OOH YEAH
Ouija
#29 Posted : 2/18/2009 8:16:13 PM
Ouija


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A better solution to learning sweeping is to simply understand chord theory or scale theory (mutually interlinked). Taking the five basic chord shapes and then moving one of the notes according to some rules will allow you to figure out any sweep pattern you want. Same goes for scales, because sweeps can be broken into two classes.... sweeping through a chord shape or sweeping through a scale pattern. Learn the five basic chord shapes and the seven basic scale 'box shapes' and then your pretty much set for all the sweeping you want.
Rosal76
#31 Posted : 12/14/2009 2:42:08 PM

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You know what? This is only my third post/reply and I am already freaking loving this forum! Dance I should have joined a long time ago! It's good to know that there are members here who have in-depth knowledge in music theory and give some really cool/difficult music examples. Also, cheers to the guys who actually use the (arpeggios) examples.

I love playing advanced/progressive/neo-classical style music. As you can figure out/understand, this topic really caught my attention. Clap
seefox
#30 Posted : 9/22/2010 1:49:39 PM
seefox


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Ouija wrote:
A better solution to learning sweeping is to simply understand chord theory or scale theory (mutually interlinked). Taking the five basic chord shapes and then moving one of the notes according to some rules will allow you to figure out any sweep pattern you want. Same goes for scales, because sweeps can be broken into two classes.... sweeping through a chord shape or sweeping through a scale pattern. Learn the five basic chord shapes and the seven basic scale 'box shapes' and then your pretty much set for all the sweeping you want.


would you mind elaborting on this or pointing me in the direction to learn this? i appriciate it ! thanks Happy
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PEACE and LOVE!
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