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AR325 or AS153 for first electric guitar and low humidity
DugT
#1 Posted : 7/22/2017 4:11:05 PM

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I’m new here and am here because I’m probably going to buy an Ibanez guitar and I have some questions. This will be my first electric guitar. I played acoustics for about twenty years but quit about twenty years ago.

I’m trying to decide between an AR325 or an AS153. I think an AS153 would look better hanging on my wall when I am not using it and that is important to me. The AR325 looks good too but the AS has more character and the ebony neck. On the other hand, the AR325 has two Tri-Sound switches vs just one for the AS153 and Tri-Sound seems like an excellent feature. As a rookie would I miss having a tri-sound switch for the bridge? I’ll be playing all sorts of somewhat simple music but no metal and no fast jazz. Another consideration is the AR325 is considerably less expensive but I will be buying used to that isn’t a huge factor. Another way of putting it is, "Would you rather have two tri-Sound switches and Rosewood fingerboard or an Ebony fingerboard and just a bridge tri-wound switch? (= AR325 vs AS135)

One of the reasons I’m getting an electric guitar is I recently moved to a very dry area and low humidity split the face of my beloved Lowden. The elevation is 6000’ and it is on the warm Reno side of the Sierra’s where Johnny Cash murdered that guy.  I’m hoping that an electric guitar will be relatively unscathed by low humidity. Since the AS153 is totally laminated is it safe here or would the AR325 be safer? Would they both be in danger? If the electric works out I will sell my Lowden steel string and my Ramirez classical guitar.

Is there an AS forum here for semi-hollows?

Sorry for the deluge of questions and I really appreciate any help.

Doug
Bill@Ibanez
#2 Posted : 7/26/2017 9:15:11 PM
Bill@Ibanez


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For a beginner, I wouldn't worry about the tri sound switches. Sure the 2nd tri sound switch may give you a little more versatility, but chances are, you'd probably be happy with the sound of a guitar without ANY tri sound switches!

Humidity and temperature definitely affect electric guitars as well as acoustics. I would say you are probably safer with an electric. It is a little more forgiving in that humidity probably won't change it as much as an acoustic guitar would. I usually try to set my guitars up a few times a year to make sure any movement in the neck is adjusted properly.

Hope this helps!
-Bill
1 user thanked Bill@Ibanez for this useful post.
DugT on 7/26/2017(UTC)
DugT
#3 Posted : 7/27/2017 5:13:51 AM

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Thanks, Bill for your helpful response.

Yesterday I bought an like new AR720FM for a great price. I love the sound and looks of it and based on reviews I might never want a better guitar.

You said electric guitars are affected by humidity regarding setup. I'm not as worried about setup as I am with wood cracking. My Lowden split in two places because of the dry air and splitting wood is what I am trying to avoid. Are electric guitars susceptible to damage for dry air?

You also said I probably wouldn't use the tri-sound switches much, if at all. It seems to me that amps can generate such a wide range of sound that the main reason for the tri switches would be to make changes fast on a stage. I don't need that.

I'm wondering if a combo amp would also be overkill for me. I foresee caring if my amp can sound like any other amp. I would prefer to have more knobs to adjust each affect, like reverb or chorus. Does this make sense?
Bill@Ibanez
#4 Posted : 7/27/2017 2:16:51 PM
Bill@Ibanez


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For Amps, it really depends on what you want out of it. Some people are happy with a tube driven amp with some more simple controls. You can always add Reverb/Chorus and things using pedals. Others prefer modeling amps that can mimic other amp sounds. For a beginner who just wants to play around at home, I'd probably recommend some kind of modeling amp. That way you can get some interesting sounds without having a lot of equipment.

Wood cracking could be something that can happen to a solid body, but I have never encountered it. I'd think your chances are VERY slim for something like this happening. Especially given that the guitar's body is mostly finished and has almost no open/raw wood showing.
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