Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

3 Pages<123>
Ouija's beginners guide to Chord Theory
Ouija
#24 Posted : 3/10/2009 9:57:43 PM
Ouija


Groups: Member
Joined: 8/27/2006(UTC)
Posts: 6,409
Man
Location: United Kingdom
Was thanked: 47 time(s) in 40 post(s)
Pretty much. I mean, if you strum a C Major chord (any shape, anywhere on the neck, with the notes being heard in any order), your bassist could complement the chord by pumping away on any of the three notes of that chord (C,E,G). Alternatively, he could pump away on any of the seven notes of the C Major scale (C,D,E,F,G,A,B) and it would still sound 'correct', though some will sound better than others (musicality is the skill of developing a feel for what works and what doesn't.... there are no absolute rules in this matter, it's down to personal preference and musical style). Your lead guitarist could also do something similar and it would still sound 'correct'.

As for the other six chords that go with the key of C Major, the same rules apply. Your bassist or lead guitarist could play the three or four notes of that individual chord being played (1st, 3rd, 5th and/or 7th), or the whole seven notes of the C Major scale. Again, it will sound 'correct' because all seven chords in the Key of C Major are made up of three or four notes from that scale.

I posted this in my scales guide, but i'll put it here as it applies to chords as well. Below is the scale of C Major near the top of the fretboard (the little grey circles), all properly numbered, with C being '1'. Look at the seven chords being played and you'll notice that none of them use notes outside the scale of C Major, that's why they all belong to the KEY of C Major, and thats why running your fingers up and down the C Major scale on a bass or on lead guitar will always sound correct for those conglomeration of chords (again, some will sound better than others depending on what type of music you like....... Jazz players actually prefer some of the more 'discordant' combinations).



So while a D Minor chord is made up of the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the D Minor scale, those three notes also happen to be the 2nd, 4th and 6th notes of the C Major scale (see above animation).
Kingrazor
#25 Posted : 3/10/2009 10:13:35 PM

Groups: Member
Joined: 12/14/2008(UTC)
Posts: 64
Man
Location: Oregon, USA
Cool, thanks. That really cleared up a lot for me. Now if I can explain this to my little brother who's trying to learn guitar...lol
SR405QM 5-string Bass, purchased in March of 2009. Given away in April of 2011.
defnist47
#26 Posted : 3/23/2009 5:40:01 PM
defnist47


Groups: Member
Joined: 3/22/2009(UTC)
Posts: 56
Very much appreciated Ouija Clap im gonna be reading more of this later for sure. Gonna take a while though XD a lot to it. But the one guy who said something bout his nephew who can't improvise for his life ROFL in my guitar class our teacher Mr. L gives us sheet music that he teaches us to read and play these kids who think they are the best ever play tabs and everything can't even read sheet music (simple stuff like ALL OF ME in 1st position) I can read 1st position only, and Mr. L is teaching us how to construct chords and soon how to make a melodic line :D can't wait music theory is great. Now I can learn lots from this.
Angelo
#27 Posted : 4/25/2009 7:07:59 PM

Groups: Member
Joined: 1/1/2009(UTC)
Posts: 194
Man
Location: London
At my school I'm always interested to see what "guitarists" can play. What strikes me the most is what Ouija said earlier, they're so dependant on TAB and have no idea of what music is. Personally I find the RGT books really useful. I'm working on my grade 7 at the moment but once you've done grade 8 you've learnt:

Keys and their signatures
Music theory of chords and scales
All chords, chord inversions and arpeggios:

- Major / 6 / 7 / 9
- Minor / 6 / 7 / 9
- Suspended 4ths
- Add 9s
- Power chords (5th chords)
- Dominant 7ths
- Dominant 11ths
- Aug and dim
- Altered bass notes (D/C. A/E)
- Altered chords. (E7#9, D#7b5#9)

All scales and modes (2 octaves and in different positions:

- Pentatonic major / minor scale
- Blues scale
- Whole tone scale
- Chromatic
- Ionian (Major scale)
- Dorian
- Phrygian
- Lydian
- Mixolydian
- Aeolian (Natural minor scale)
- Locrian

The exams go like this:

1. Play chords that are called out.
2. Play the a few scales in various keys.
3. Some questions about the instrument (Action, pickups...)
4. You’re given a chord chart and you have to play it. (May include dodgy time signatures, key changes, dynamics and codas)
5. You’re given a chord chart and you have to work out it’s key (and any key changes) and play lead guitar whilst the examiner does rhythm. (My favourite part!)
6. Clapping in time and repletion of rhythmic and melodic phrases (You’re given the key).
7. Note and chord theory.

No pieces involved, it’s good old fashioned on the spot guitar playing! I think they’re by far the best guitar exam you can do! The end product?... a guitarist who can read music on the spot and can improvise and KNOW what they’re doing.

Check it out here.
akustikgitar
#28 Posted : 4/26/2009 9:18:40 AM
akustikgitar


Groups: Member
Joined: 10/17/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,713
Man
Location: South Carolina, USA
Was thanked: 2 time(s) in 2 post(s)
RGT looks like a great program of study. Thanks for the info Angelo! Happy
Angelo
#29 Posted : 4/26/2009 11:06:23 AM

Groups: Member
Joined: 1/1/2009(UTC)
Posts: 194
Man
Location: London
No problem. I'm working on my 7 right now and I'm getting the hang of diatonic theory and shredding.
akustikgitar
#30 Posted : 4/27/2009 9:42:16 AM
akustikgitar


Groups: Member
Joined: 10/17/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,713
Man
Location: South Carolina, USA
Was thanked: 2 time(s) in 2 post(s)
Angelo wrote:
No problem. I'm working on my 7 right now and I'm getting the hang of diatonic theory and shredding.

Very impressive Angelo! Clap How long have you been working with the RGT program? What level did you begin at?
Angelo
#31 Posted : 5/1/2009 1:53:08 PM

Groups: Member
Joined: 1/1/2009(UTC)
Posts: 194
Man
Location: London
Hmm I started playing guitar at the age of 7 and I did my first grade 1 at the age of 10. That was simple open chords (D, A7, G, E) and some set scales (G major, E blues, A pentatonic).

I them took a break from it all and jumped to grade 4 which was 2 possition barre chords on the E and A string in any key (Major, Minor, 7th, Minor 7th and major 7th) and 2 octave scales in any key. (Major, Minor, Blues, Pentatonic)

Then I went to grade 6 which introduced diminished, augamented, sus 4ths, 6th's and 9ths. It also change from 2 - 2 octave argegios to 5 seperate 1 octave scales (in differant possitions on the neck). I got honnors in grades 1 and 6 merit in grade 4.

I personally think that after a while people should jump into grade 3 or 4. Grades 1 and 2 seem pointless and you hardly know anything. However these books can teach you all the chords, theories, scales and arpeggios, but they cannot how you how to play a great guitar solo. That only comes from experience. I find that studying Hendrix, SRV and Satriani broadens my understanding with Rock, Blues and metal (Pentatonic, Blues and diatonic scales).

Whichever floats you boat. I find it works wonders.

Angelo
akustikgitar
#32 Posted : 5/4/2009 8:46:59 AM
akustikgitar


Groups: Member
Joined: 10/17/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,713
Man
Location: South Carolina, USA
Was thanked: 2 time(s) in 2 post(s)
Thanks for sharing Angelo! Happy
guitartist [=]===:::
#33 Posted : 6/9/2009 3:41:58 PM

Groups: Member
Joined: 6/5/2009(UTC)
Posts: 3
Excellent guide, very well done.
Nefalia
#34 Posted : 6/22/2009 7:55:25 AM

Groups: Member
Joined: 3/8/2009(UTC)
Posts: 47
Even though I'm not a beginner, this guide has given me new perspectives and insights on how to view the chords I play. Thanks, Ouija, for taking what seems to have been a considerable amount of time to share this.
Ouija
#35 Posted : 6/22/2009 7:07:01 PM
Ouija


Groups: Member
Joined: 8/27/2006(UTC)
Posts: 6,409
Man
Location: United Kingdom
Was thanked: 47 time(s) in 40 post(s)
Don't mention it........... no.... really!Shifty

The first rule of chord theory is "You don't talk about chord theory".
The second rule of chord theory is "You don't talk about chord theory".
And the third rule of chord theory is "You don't talk about chord theory"
Shhh

So tell no one. I'm warning you (or everybody will want some).

Naughty
Kingrazor
#36 Posted : 8/12/2009 3:12:32 AM

Groups: Member
Joined: 12/14/2008(UTC)
Posts: 64
Man
Location: Oregon, USA
I have to ask, how do people pull off the physical act of playing a chord on a guitar anyway? As much as I try I can't seem to do it.

Anyway, I had a question about chord shapes. Since Drop D and Drop C tunings are common in metal and other genres, are there some standard chord shapes followed in those tunings?
SR405QM 5-string Bass, purchased in March of 2009. Given away in April of 2011.
Ouija
#37 Posted : 8/12/2009 10:22:41 AM
Ouija


Groups: Member
Joined: 8/27/2006(UTC)
Posts: 6,409
Man
Location: United Kingdom
Was thanked: 47 time(s) in 40 post(s)
Kingrazor wrote:
I have to ask, how do people pull off the physical act of playing a chord on a guitar anyway? As much as I try I can't seem to do it.


Aaahh! In which case, i bet your one of these people who just detune the top string by two frets so that you can play a simple Root/5th/Root powerchord by laying your finger across the top three strings.

Kingrazor wrote:

Anyway, I had a question about chord shapes. Since Drop D and Drop C tunings are common in metal and other genres, are there some standard chord shapes followed in those tunings?


Bingo.... lol.

The five chord shapes for standard tuning are identical in Drop D or Drop C, only with the note on the top string relocated two frets higher (since the strings tuned two frets lower).

Personally, i never play in Drop tunings as it makes the act of playing the guitar more difficult and breaks the symmetry of the guitars tuning. Makes it easier to begin with though, which is why so many beginners fall into the trap of dropping the E string and then never get out of it or learn to do any chords harder than the one finger powerchord trick mentioned earlier.

Kingrazor
#38 Posted : 8/12/2009 6:28:56 PM

Groups: Member
Joined: 12/14/2008(UTC)
Posts: 64
Man
Location: Oregon, USA
Ouija wrote:
Kingrazor wrote:
I have to ask, how do people pull off the physical act of playing a chord on a guitar anyway? As much as I try I can't seem to do it.


Aaahh! In which case, i bet your one of these people who just detune the top string by two frets so that you can play a simple Root/5th/Root powerchord by laying your finger across the top three strings.

Kingrazor wrote:

Anyway, I had a question about chord shapes. Since Drop D and Drop C tunings are common in metal and other genres, are there some standard chord shapes followed in those tunings?


Bingo.... lol.

The five chord shapes for standard tuning are identical in Drop D or Drop C, only with the note on the top string relocated two frets higher (since the strings tuned two frets lower).

Personally, i never play in Drop tunings as it makes the act of playing the guitar more difficult and breaks the symmetry of the guitars tuning. Makes it easier to begin with though, which is why so many beginners fall into the trap of dropping the E string and then never get out of it or learn to do any chords harder than the one finger powerchord trick mentioned earlier.

The first part of my post was actually about playing with standard tuning. I just can't seem to finger most chords, and the ones I can are quite difficult to hold and play.

And as for tuning, does the same apply to C-G-C-F-A-D tuning?
SR405QM 5-string Bass, purchased in March of 2009. Given away in April of 2011.
MaxOfMetal
#40 Posted : 8/12/2009 6:40:11 PM
MaxOfMetal


Groups: Member
Joined: 1/10/2009(UTC)
Posts: 4,606
Man
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 3 post(s)
Kingrazor wrote:
Ouija wrote:
Kingrazor wrote:
I have to ask, how do people pull off the physical act of playing a chord on a guitar anyway? As much as I try I can't seem to do it.


Aaahh! In which case, i bet your one of these people who just detune the top string by two frets so that you can play a simple Root/5th/Root powerchord by laying your finger across the top three strings.

Kingrazor wrote:

Anyway, I had a question about chord shapes. Since Drop D and Drop C tunings are common in metal and other genres, are there some standard chord shapes followed in those tunings?


Bingo.... lol.

The five chord shapes for standard tuning are identical in Drop D or Drop C, only with the note on the top string relocated two frets higher (since the strings tuned two frets lower).

Personally, i never play in Drop tunings as it makes the act of playing the guitar more difficult and breaks the symmetry of the guitars tuning. Makes it easier to begin with though, which is why so many beginners fall into the trap of dropping the E string and then never get out of it or learn to do any chords harder than the one finger powerchord trick mentioned earlier.

The first part of my post was actually about playing with standard tuning. I just can't seem to finger most chords, and the ones I can are quite difficult to hold and play.

And as for tuning, does the same apply to C-G-C-F-A-D tuning?


The only way to learn to play chords is to stick with it and practice, your hands will strengthen and the muscles will gain memory of the positions. A lot harder than it looks huh?

As for tunings, look at it this way for every interval you tune down, you need to move your fingers up one fret. Which means if you tune down half a step (Eb Ab Db Gb C# Eb) you'll have to move up the fretboard one fret.
Current Ibanez "Heard":
91' UV7BK "Green Dot"
91' UV7PWH
Ouija
#39 Posted : 8/12/2009 11:49:51 PM
Ouija


Groups: Member
Joined: 8/27/2006(UTC)
Posts: 6,409
Man
Location: United Kingdom
Was thanked: 47 time(s) in 40 post(s)
Kingrazor wrote:

And as for tuning, does the same apply to C-G-C-F-A-D tuning?


The relation ship of the strings in that tuning is no different than in Drop D. So yes, the same chord shapes work. But, like Drop D, you have to alter the position of the top note as that string is two notes lower than it should be. For instance, if it was detuned to D-G-C-F-A-D, the standard chord shapes would work (they'd just all be two notes lower in pitch).
Ouija
#41 Posted : 8/20/2009 8:17:02 AM
Ouija


Groups: Member
Joined: 8/27/2006(UTC)
Posts: 6,409
Man
Location: United Kingdom
Was thanked: 47 time(s) in 40 post(s)
Well, ain't these threads popular. Just got a message from photobucket saying that i'm about to exceed the alloted bandwidth of 25gb a month and all my images will be 'put on hold' until the 22nd of next month. So if all the images disappear, you know why.
teamhex2
#42 Posted : 12/16/2009 2:45:54 PM

Groups: Member
Joined: 12/15/2009(UTC)
Posts: 11
Location: Houston
This seems like a great guide, ill have to read it when I get home. I don't think ill fully understand it even if I read it, but ill try. Photo-bucket's blocked at work so im hoping the pictures come up at home.
blaze86
#43 Posted : 12/19/2009 5:42:32 AM
blaze86


Groups: Member
Joined: 12/17/2009(UTC)
Posts: 6
Man
Location: UK
thats exactly what i was looking for...
thanks a lot for this great post, you rock mate!!
Users browsing this topic
Guest (2)
3 Pages<123>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.